Monday, January 13, 2014

We are having a heat wave

Or as Al Gore would say "The planet is having a fever"

I say bring it on.

Three degrees feels positively balmy after the ungodly temps we have been getting around here.
24 hours of slop, rain, and rising temps brought down the snowbanks a bit and left a mess of ice. Perfect time for a bit of grilling.
So I fired up the hibachi. The torch is the best way to do this and no need for charcoal starter fluid to make your food taste funny.
After about 8 minutes coals are going strong so I pull the chimney off, spread the coals and let the grill and hibachi heat up well, and the coals get a good glow going.
Pound and a third of oiled and salted swordfish and the last of this summers cherry tomatoes go on.
Flip them over after about 4 minutes and let them rip for an other 3 minutes
Serve with rice and a side salad. Nothing like some mid winter grilling. Yes the price on the swordfish is not cheap at 11 $ a pound, but it is far cheaper than going out to a restaurant as you would drop 65$ for a meal for two like this around these parts.



10 comments:

  1. I get my charcoal going by firing some over my gas hob, works a treat!

    For grilled fish like that, Marcia makes a delicious salad using water cress and natural unflavoured live yoghurt.

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  2. BTW, why is it that when you switch to metric temperature, relative humidity increases? Is that because US made temperature displays consider Europeans wetter than their North American cousins?

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    1. That would be because its a cheap Chinese P.O.S. thermometer, and the hygrometer window is on the back of the thing appropriately blocked by the wall it hangs on. So when I unhook it from the screw it is hung on to flip the switch on the back of the thing to metric it suddenly exposed to a fresh blast of moisture.

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  3. That looks some good fish! Not sure I've ever had sword fish before - I guess living in a landlocked village my choice of fish is limited somewhat!
    And a nice little stove to cook it on. On a program I watched the other night they made a tandoori oven out of a bin and a flower pot, they could even cook nan bread in the traditonal way on it and it got to double the temperature of a normal oven.

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    1. Kev, the sword fish is excellent grilling fish as it is quite firm so it can take a flame without getting all flaky and falling apart. We get it real fresh around here, usually right of the boat that morning. It really is good. I think you'd know if you've had it. The little hibachi grill I built last year to replace the old cast iron one. Works much better as it is not such a heat sink as the old iron one so it heats up quicker and runs hotter. What I love about it is it only takes about 15 minutes to get it ready to cook. And by the time we are done eating I can empty the coals in a tin bucket and when we are done doing the dishes its cool enough to be put away in the garage. Here is the post from when I built it.
      http://isserfiq.blogspot.com/2012/09/new-hibachithe-old-one-is-getting-quite.html

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  4. That's my kinda BBQ. A simple looking grill, some flame, some smoke, and a few good things to chuck on it. Perfect.

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    1. Thanks for visiting Cro. Yes I am very happy with the little hibachi grill. It was what I could build from what I had available, some aluminum plate scraps I had. I really did not know if it would work when I built it but it turns out it works so much better that the one I replaced. See the link in my comment to Kev above. The style of grill is typical of Venezuela where I am originally from. There they call it an Anafre. Caveman that I am and ever so partial to charred meat, in summer I use it two or three times a week. In winter things get a bit more difficult, but I try to take advantage of it when the temps come above freezing.

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    2. My wife spent quite a few years in Caracas; her father was 'Our man in Venezuela' with the British Diplomatic service.

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    3. Cro: What years was she there? If her family was there in the late 70s it is likely she attended CIC (Colegio Internacional de Caracas). I would not be surprised if we sat in the same classroom. I was at CIC 77 to 1980. Most kids of the diplomatic services of just about every country that were stationed there wound up at CIC. It was the who's who of international relations. I was one of the few token "local" brats at the school.

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