Monday, April 19, 2021

Back By Popular Demand. . .

 Yea so I've been slacking for a bit and my devoted followers , all three of them , have been complaining about my absence . . . . . . sheesh the things I have to do ! ! ! ! !

OK guys . . . I'll throw you a bone . . .

So there I was on a sunny Sunday a week ago making space in my tool shed to put away my snow blower . This involves chucking out most of the crap from the shed , evicting the mice that have taken up residence and rearranging all my junk to make space for the snow blower . Thrilling stuff eh ?

  When I got the call to go play with the Bonanza . . .  Well yea  !  

So I chuck all that crap back in the shed real quick and meet Clint at the airport thirty minutes later .

 Seems the autopilot had developed a mind of its own and it had been in the shop to have the servos replaced , so we needed to test it . We also needed to update the software for the Garmin radios. 

So we moved the plane out of the hangar so the radios could see the satellites and locate itself . 

Loaded the updates in the radios , fired up the engine and got our clearance from the tower .

A quick takeoff on runway 18 puts us over Rigby Yard in South Portland .

And soon over Scarborough . . . the red arrow points at my house .

When we engage the autopilot it quickly proves it is still on the fritz .  As soon as we switch it on the plane initiates a steep climb and wants to do its own aerobatic sequence . . . . Yikes that's not good . . . Switch it off . . . Electric trim is also doing what ever it wants now . . . . OK that's enough of that .

We did get the Garmin to talk to the I-pad so we have real time image on the approach plates as we set up to do a practice approach into runway 11 .
 
This is what it looks like once we are on short final and initiate the missed approach .
 
And as we turn downwind for runway 18 over Portland


and turning base to final for landing on runway 18

Just a short figure eight around the patch .

Wednesday, December 30, 2020

Building a Gantry crane

 This week's mission was to get 400 lbs of thickness planer into a basement workshop .

After a run to the lumberyard we started making sawdust

Took most of the morning to build a pair of these
and one of these .  .  .

Rolled the planer in place in front of the basement bulkhead and assembled our home built gantry crane

After a quick run to the hardware store for some shackles . . .

The Chineseum chain hoist from Harbor-Fright picks up the weight nicely. . .

and delivers it . . .

. . .  nicely onto its base at floor level in the cellar .

One happy customer

And other than today's very sore back , no major blood letting injuries .

Now about those swamp rats in DC . . . We built this rig so it is modular and highly portable . It can be set up and broken down in a matter of about five minutes in any public square .


Monday, November 16, 2020

Moving Rocks

 In this week's fascinating episode on how to wreck the human body . . . . granite stair treads .

August last year I removed mom's front steps in preparation for rebuilding the driveway .

The photo does not show it well , but after forty years the granite slabs had tilted and sunk due to the weight of the right hand side wall sitting on them and they were no longer level . They were so out of kilter that they collected ponds of water and ice in the corners which made them unusable in winter . The elevation of the driveway would be changing anyhow so they needed to be reset and leveled to the new grade. I got estimates for the work that ran over ten thousand dollars . 

Nope , that's not happening while I am around here .

Having consulted with Mr Google I calculated the weight on those slabs to be about six hundred and fifty pounds each , and the rating on that glorified pooper-scooper bucket was about seven hundred pounds when it was new . No telling what it is now seventy years after it left the factory . As there was no way to really pick up the granite slabs with the bucket and still have traction on the rear wheels , I lifted them with my Home Built Skidder Post on the three point hitch . 

The contractor got to us in October last year and dug up the muddy old driveway down about a foot and laid in a liner and new crushed rock .

And beautifully pitched and compacted new gravel . 

And we let it be for a year . 

Then in early September this year the pavers showed up .

And put in the nice hot top pavement . 
 
Beautiful smooth bitumen .
 
We no longer need to go four-wheeling to make it around that bend .
 
 
I can relate to that cat .
 
So last week while we enjoyed a spell of Indian Summer it was my turn to put my best "ugly stripper"  back into it . I went up to Mom's on Tuesday just hoping to shovel out the soil enough while it was still soft and dry and then wait for freeze-up to lay the granite back in place .
 
 
 But I got inspired and figured I'd try my new Flea-bay chineseum $98 forklift tines and see if I could even pick up the slabs .
 
And with the hydraulic oil in the system still relatively cold and the barrel full of rocks in the back as a counterweight , I actually had enough traction to pick up those six hundred and fifty pound granite slabs.
 
And after about two hours of digging dirt and levering the slabs , I had two of them in place . . . 

Three was  a charm .  The fourth one . . . not so much .  Took about five hours work to get this far .

That fourth slab had a big belly on the underside and was considerably heavier than the first three . The worn out and by now hot hydraulics on the tractor had all they could do to lift it six inches off the ground . It's three thirty pm and I'm beat anyhow , how about I call it good for today . I'll sleep on this one and see what I can do about it in the morning .
 
 
Wednesday morning with fresh eyes I figured I got to make it lighter somehow . So after some levering with the six foot bar to stand it up on edge  I set about trying my hand at being Michelangelo . 

Got several decent sized flakes off it and got a larger one started . . . . a minor gain .

Working the seam

So satisfying after beating on it for an hour to see it finally start to give . 
 
Aha . I'll beat you yet you bastard . That had to be fifty pounds right there . See that nice curved shelf there ? I worked that one with the chisel and maul for another forty minutes . . .
 
Got ya now . . . That had to be at least a hundred pounds in one flake . 
I probably took two hundred pounds off it by now .

With the still relatively cold hydraulics , the tractor made easy work of lifting it four feet up this time . 
 
Between getting them in place and actually having them level where I wanted , there was a lot of huffing and puffing levering with the six foot breaker-bar to dig out under them and shim in other places that never made it on camera . 
 
And the last one goes in place .
 
OK its two pm and I have not had lunch yet .  If I could only have one more slab it would get me to the level of the wooden landing . 
While chuffing down a sandwich I contemplate my handiwork . Look at that corner of the wall !  Between the chipmunks tunneling , and last winter's ice it's collapsing on us . Best to do something about that now or we'll soon have a mess on the new pavement .

 
Honestly I was going to leave that wall for the spring . . . but if I could only reset these three rocks . . .
Two hours later . . . not bad for a hack if I do say so myself .  The other corner of the retaining wall also needs a bit of mending but it can wait till next spring . The wooden stairs are in bad shape and need to be replaced , so I'll see what I can do to make it all an even run at that point too . But that's enough for this season . I really did not think I'd get this job done this year at all .


Friday, November 13, 2020

Putting a new roof on my barn

Or what did you do last weekend ?

The south side of the roof on my barn was not looking so good after about twenty years in the weather.

 
So on Friday morning I bought nine bundles of shingles to redo that upper pitch of the Gambrel roof that faces south and gets baked the worst by the sun .


I moved each ninety pound bundle four times before they were on the roof . . .

See that bend in my back ?
 
Its pretty much permanent now , and this is what it looks like on a good day . . .

But if the roof is to get done . . . 

I don't really have a choice . . .
 
And that's why I hurt . . .

. . . and my legs tremble .

But I'm hiding the ugly

 
Are we having fun yet ?
 
By four thirty on Friday I had the south pitch done .

I will tear into the ridge cap in the morning .

Time to quit anyhow as the sun has set and I can't see much
 
After licking my wounds and sleeping on it overnight I figured I might as well get the north side done too while I was at it . 
So Saturday morning I ran back to Lowe's and got another nine bundles of shingles plus one for the ridge cap and  hefted them up the ladder . 
That was a total of 1890 lbs moved four times from the store stack to the top of my barn .

By sunset on Saturday I got the north side top pitch done .
I'll dig into the ridge cap in the morning . .  didn't I say that on Friday night ?

Sunday morning I tore the ridge cap and vent off to discover why my shop is always so hot

Yea that ridge vent was just decoration . Whoever put it on there did not leave enough a gap in the sheathing boards at the ridge to allow positive airflow .

So I deleted the vent and capped the ridge over

By Sunday noontime the roof was done .

Then after lunch I cut in and installed a new vent in the back gable .

and a big honking fan to suck the heat out of my shop.

And because that was not enough abuse we also dug up the second flower bed on the front of the house

Sifted all the invasive bulbs and grass roots out of the soil , mixed it with manure . . .

And on Monday I lined the bed with heavy plastic in an attempt to keep the maple roots out , and rebuilt the flower bed .